Annual Title I Schoolwide Plan

Division Name: Fairfax County Public Schools     

School Name: Glen Forest ES

Cindi Choate, Principal  

Date: October 27, 2017

Revision  

Title I schools implementing schoolwide programs are required to develop schoolwide plans in accordance with Section 1114(b) of the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA). Guidelines for plan development include the following:

  • The plan should be developed with the involvement of:
    • Parents;
    • Other members of the community to be served;
    • Individuals who will carry out the plan, including teachers, principals, other school leaders, administrators, paraprofessionals present in the school;
    • The local education agency;
    • To the extent feasible, tribes and tribal organizations present in the community; and
    • If appropriate
      • Specialized instructional support personnel;
      • Technical assistance providers;
      • School staff; and
    • If the plan relates to a secondary school, students and other individuals determined by the school;
  • The plan should be available to the Local Educational Agency (LEA), parents, and the public; information in the plan should be in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language that parents can understand; and
  • If appropriate and applicable, the plan should be developed in coordination and integration with other federal, state, and local services, resources, and  programs, such as programs supported under ESSA, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start programs, adult education programs, career and technical education programs, and schools implementing comprehensive support and improvement activities or targeted support and improvement activities under section 1111(d).

The ESEA requires four components to be included in the schoolwide plan.  For each component, the narrative section in the template should be completed in sufficient detail to document how the component has been thoroughly and thoughtfully addressed. Schoolwide plans should be reviewed annually and revised as necessary to promote continuous improvement and to reflect the school’s initiatives to upgrade the entire educational program of the school.

To maintain focus, eliminate duplication of effort, and promote comprehensiveness, schools should operate under a single plan if at all possible. A school that already has a plan for school improvement might consider amending it, rather than starting over, provided that the existing plan was based on a comprehensive needs assessment and can be revised to include the four required schoolwide components. 

Narrative: At the end of 2016-2017 school year, our entire staff; including literacy, math, and instructional coaches, analyzed a variety of data and determined areas of strength and weakness, and trends across grade levels that had emerged throughout the year during our Quarterly Reviews and weekly CLT's with each grade level. During the last month of school and over the first contract week, SOL data was shared with the whole staff. Grade level teams participated in staff development related to the SIIP. These workshops provided background knowledge for our new teachers and set the stage for the expectations for the upcoming school year.

Our School Innovation and Improvement Plan includes SMARTR goals in reading, math and science. Individual teachers have created SMARTR goals which will allow them to collect monthly data on the reading growth of students. Teachers will use that data to differentiate, reteach, and scaffold their instruction to meet the needs of their students.  All classroom instructors are receiving embedded PD to further their skills in providing quality instruction and supporting Tier 2 intervention and enrichment opportunities within their daily schedules. School wide support will be available for all teachers to build their understanding of effective practices to improve students’ math and literacy through our coaching model and Cluster Coaching throughout the school year.  A variety of professional development opportunities on best practices for reading, math, and science will be provided during the year. Implementation of the strategies and actions in the SIIP will be assessed during our CLTs and periodically using on-time data.

The 2017-2018 master instructional schedule continues to support our co-teaching model during the reading and math blocks and allow for common planning time for each grade level and all co-teachers. Teachers meet weekly in Collaborative Learning Teams to unpack standards/units, plan instruction, analyze data, create common assessments, discuss student learning needs and plan remediation/enrichment strategies for students in both reading and math.  Additional time is allocated for Collaborative Learning Teams to do the same for science during each quarter. Professional development in the area of science instruction will be provided to teachers in grades 4 & 5 by the FCPS Science Specialist.

For reading, a review of our SOL, DRA2 and DRA2 Word Analysis data indicates that reading is an area on which we will continue to focus.  Although we are fully accredited in the category of all students with a pass rate of 88%, we still need to close the achievement gap with our Hispanic students and our students with disabilities.  59% of students in grades 1-5 met or exceeded the DRA 2 benchmark for their grade level. 86% of students in grades K-5 met their targeted reading growth as outlined in the SIIP SMARTR goal. (See data in SIIP) We are continuing our focus on building student independent reading stamina and engaged time in texts, reading conferences, and implementing all components of the reading/writing workshop. Upper grades are embedding the use of various Advanced Academic Program materials for literacy; such as, Caesar’s English, Socratic Seminars, Grammar Island and Touch Pebbles. We will also continue the expansion of the RI model to provide targeted support when necessary. ESOL and Special Education teachers will also provide targeted support to small groups during the literacy block.

For mathematics, our overall SOL pass rate was 92%. However, our SOL assessment results show an achievement gap between All students and Gap Group 3. (74% compared to 67%). The pass rate for the KMRA/MRA for Kindergarten through Second Grade ranged from 74 – 93%. (See data in SIIP). Strategies and action plans were developed to meet student needs based on the data from the SOL's and MRA's. These include strengthening our Tier 1 instruction, providing professional development on math workshop, with full implementation of all its components to fidelity. All grade levels use a form of Four Square as a spiral review strategy and include an M2 or M3 unit from the Advanced Academic Program to increase students' critical and creative thinking skills.

We will continue our expansion of the RI model to provide targeted support, especially to those students in Gap Group 3 and SWD. We will focus on increasing the use of high quality performance tasks and applications to real world situations by integrating Project Based Learning across the curriculum in all grade levels. ESOL and Special Education teachers will provide targeted support to small groups during the literacy and math blocks. Special Education teachers are utilizing individualized data notebooks and progress monitoring sheets to track students' progress. All classroom teachers are taking monthly anecdotal and/or running records to assess their students’ reading progress.

Component 1: A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that takes into account information on the academic achievement of children in relation to the challenging state academic standards, particularly the needs of those children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing, to meet the challenging state academic standards and any other factors as determined by the local educational agency.

Evidence: A systematic effort involving multiple stakeholders to acquire an accurate and thorough picture of strengths and weaknesses of the school community, thus identifying student needs through a variety of information-gathering techniques. A data analysis summary must be included which incorporates benchmarks used to evaluate program results. The results of your data analysis must guide the reform strategies that you will implement to improve instruction for all students.

Component 2: Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children, including each of the subgroups of students (as defined in section 1111(c)(2)) to meet the challenging state academic standards.

Evidence: Scientifically-based research strategies based on identified needs and designed to raise the achievement level of all students on content standards. Provide information on how the selected strategies will increase student achievement in underperforming subgroups, if applicable. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative: Based on the data analysis and needs identified for literacy, Glen Forest is committed to incorporating all components of the balanced literacy framework, building independent student stamina and engagement in texts, and with staff participating in professional development that meets their needs. Expansion of the RI model to target identified student need will support student progress. Grade level teams meet on a weekly basis to collaborate in the area of language arts. Their focus is on             reflecting and refining instruction, developing pre- and post-common assessments, ongoing data analysis, and embedded professional development. Literacy coaches assigned to each team will provide assistance with instructional strategies, data analysis and professional development related to our SIIP goals and individual/team needs. Teams will continue to develop an understanding of the big literacy ideas and key vocabulary for each unit of study. In collaboration with our AARTs, coaches and teachers across the upper grades are embedding various Advanced Academic curriculum programs into the general education setting; such as, Caesar’s English and Grammar Island. Our co-teaching model will support ESOL and Special Education students as they are fully included in general education classrooms. Utilizing this model effectively creates an approximately 10:1 ratio in most classrooms, thereby allowing for small group instruction.

Based on the data analysis and needs identified above for mathematics, Glen Forest is working to strengthen mathematics instruction by continuing the math workshop model that emphasizes problem solving through daily focus lessons, small group mathematics instruction, and independent practice and extension opportunities. An emphasis will be placed on increasing students' critical and creative thinking skills. Teachers will use Four Square to provide a spiral review of taught math concepts. Math coaches will provide professional development on the core components of the math workshop and the Advanced Academic curriculum. (M2/M3) Additionally, teams  meet on a weekly basis to collaborate in the area of mathematics. Their focus is on reflecting and refining instruction, developing pre- and post-common assessments, ongoing data analysis, and embedded professional development. The math coach assigned to each team will provide assistance with instructional strategies, data  analysis, and professional development related to our SIIP goals and individual/team needs. Teams will continue to develop an understanding of the big mathematical ideas and key vocabulary for each unit of study. Our co-teaching model will support ESOL and Special Education students as they are fully included in general education classrooms. Utilizing this model effectively creates an approximately 10:1 ratio in most classrooms, thereby allowing for small group instruction. We will also continue to use Dreambox, a math software program, to target student needs.

Methods to Evaluate Effectiveness:  Student achievement will be closely monitored in all subject areas in a variety of ways including but not limited to exit tickets, formative assessments, division assessments, DRA2, and student interviews. On a monthly basis, teachers will evaluate student reading progress using anecdotal and/or running records which will be tracked to monitor and modify reading groups as needed. This data will be analyzed regularly in CLTs to guide instructional decisions. Most student data will be housed in the Education Decision Support Library (EDSL), in addition to our in-school data walls. Grade level teams will document the work done in CLTs to strengthen Tier 1 instruction including unpacking content, lesson plans, creation of assessments, and an analysis of assessment data.

Component 3: Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that use methods and instructional strategies that strengthen the academic program in the school; increase the amount and quality of learning time; and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, which may include programs, activities, and courses necessary to provide a well-rounded education. Evidence: Scientifically-based research strategies or activities that strengthen and enrich the academic program by: extending the school day; embedding reading and/or mathematics curricula into other instructional areas; or other strategies as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative: Each K-5 class will continue to provide daily uninterrupted language arts and math instruction, along with time for science, social studies, and health instruction. Advanced Mathematics is offered in the 3-5 grade Advanced Academic classes, with other students who qualify flexed in as necessary. Rising Kindergarten students attended the Bridge to Kindergarten summer program and those who qualified were assessed with the WIDA-Apt and other early childhood assessments which helped facilitate their placement in Kindergarten classes. A three week summer program for students in grades 1-5 addressed literacy. In addition, we hosted two Newcomers’ classes for ESOL students providing targeted support in building vocabulary and oral language to selected students, and three classes of Young Scholars’ using the Advanced Academic curriculum for typically under-represented students in gifted programs. Our library was open one day each week over the summer providing students with access to good  

literature and literacy activities. During the school year, in conjunction with our PTA, we offered numerous after school clubs for all students; such as, Spanish, Chinese, LEGO robotics, chess, ballet, to name just a few. We will continue to provide opportunities for increased learning time based on budget allocations.

Our two Advanced Academic Resource teachers co-teach with our Advanced Academics teachers in grades 3, 4, and 5.  Additionally, they provide lessons in all classrooms K-5, and work closely with teachers, coaches, and other school personnel to identify and recommend students for Young Scholars and Advanced Academic services. In grades K-2, the AART's work with individual students to provide enrichment in reading, math, and science. In addition, students in grades K-3 where provided weekly arts integration lessons during specials.

Family Engagement activities assure that Glen Forest families play a significant role in helping our students achieve the challenging state standards. Glen Forest provides a wide variety of opportunities throughout the year to help parents learn ways to support student learning. The following are a few of the actions that will be implemented to carry out the goals outlined in the school-home compact and family engagement policy.

  • Partners in Print--held twice a year for all grade level families to learn literacy strategies to use at home with their children.
  • Family Mobile Science Night--stations are provided for families to interact with hands on science activities.
  • Advanced Academics Information Night--held twice a year to provide information about AAP services available for students and helps parents understand how their children can be involved.
  • Family Math Night--held once a year to show parents how board games assist their children in learning math concepts in a fun and engaging manner
  • International Night--a cultural event to showcase families, food, music, and dress from different cultures.
  • Parent Liaison sponsored workshops held monthly on a variety of topics, including, computer safety, bullying, SOL's, etc. to increase parent awareness and assist their child's academic success.
  • English language and Arabic Early Literacy classes provided by FCPS personnel on a weekly basis.
  • Development and training/orientation for classroom room parents conducted by the administration.
  • Parent volunteers for community events; such as, Book Fair and monthly Family Food Market.
  • Family Field trips that highlight the various cultural events in the metro area.
  • Other examples are Family Book Clubs, Bingo Night, Family Movie Nights, and Family Picnics.

Methods to Evaluate Effectiveness:  Student achievement will be closely monitored in all subject areas in a variety of ways including but not limited to exit tickets, formative assessments, division assessments, DRA2, and student interviews. On a monthly basis, teachers will evaluate student reading progress using anecdotal and/or running records which will be tracked to monitor and modify reading groups as needed. This data will be analyzed regularly in CLTs to guide instructional decisions. Most student data will be housed in the Education Decision Support Library (EDSL), in addition to our in-school data walls. Grade level teams will document the work done in CLTs to strengthen Tier 1 instruction including unpacking content, lesson plans, creation of assessments, and an analysis of assessment data.  

Component 4: Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs those at risk of not meeting the challenging state academic standards, through activities which may include— Counseling, school-based mental health programs, specialized instructional support services, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ skills outside the academic subject areas;

Preparation for and awareness of opportunities for postsecondary education and the workforce, which may include career and technical education programs and broadening secondary school students’ access to coursework to earn postsecondary credit while still in high school (such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual or concurrent enrollment, or early college high schools);

Implementation of a schoolwide tiered model to prevent and address problem behavior, and early intervening services, coordinated with similar activities and services carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);

Professional development and other activities for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other school personnel to improve instruction and use of data from academic assessments, and to recruit and retain effective teachers, particularly in high-need subjects; and

Strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs and, if programs are consolidated, the specific state educational agency and local education agency programs and other federal programs that will be consolidated in the schoolwide program.

Evidence:  Scientifically-based research strategies or activities such as student support services; behavior intervention systems; tiered systems of support; teacher recruitment and/or retention activities; or other activities as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative: Our two school counselors facilitate lessons on character building, and self-regulation monthly in all classrooms K-5 and regular group and individual meetings for students who need additional social-emotional support. They also provide support to classroom teachers by developing behavior plans in conjunction with the classroom teacher and meeting with parents to discuss the social and emotional needs of students. Both of our counselors are trained in Unstuck and On Target and use these strategies to address specific student needs. This year we added a part-time counselor to assist with the needs of our student body and their families. In addition, we are implementing Positivity Project across the school to strength character development.

Our full-time social worker, who speaks Spanish, coordinates with county and community services to identify and address family needs that support students' availability  for learning, including health care and nutrition.  We will continue our monthly food pantry to assist families in need. Donated school supplies are available for immediate use by students. The social worker additionally offers individualized and small group support for students who require assistance in managing situations of stress and anxiety. Our full-time school psychologist also offers individualized and small group support for students.  Both have been trained in Unstuck and On-Target and use this to provide additional assistance to children.

The PBA committee meets during the year to analyze student discipline data. The counselors, social worker, and school psychologist collect data on the students with whom they work and meet weekly during their Mental Health CLT to support each other in targeting specific student needs. We also track the number of families who come to our monthly Family Food Market.  

Glen Forest Elementary School engages in strategic efforts to retain high quality staff that understand and can meet the needs of all of our students. Team members assist with recruiting, paneling and hiring of staff members as everyone is vested in the success of our new teachers. The school leadership team creates a culture of open communication with instructional staff members serving as active members of the committees that support our School Innovation and Improvement Plan. Committees  and CLT's are facilitated and chaired by teachers who develop agendas, plan meetings, and analyze results of their endeavors.

Staff is regularly invited to provide feedback and input into school and team decisions as a way to maintain active engagement in building and maintaining positive school climate and working conditions. Teachers newly hired are provided with the Great Beginnings induction program to assist them in their transition to the classroom.  In addition, Glen Forest has a mentoring program for all new staff members and coaches that provide additional assistance; especially, in the area of Literacy, Math and classroom management.

Ongoing professional development and teacher mentoring is in place to increase and sustain the best quality of instruction and provide new and veteran teachers the support system they need to continue at Glen Forest Elementary School. Additionally, all teachers receive coaching and embedded professional learning related to specific core instructional practices, including assessment training. As a Literacy Collaborative School, primary teachers are provided graduate coursework and coaching to further their skills in providing a balanced and high quality literacy program to all students. We extended that philosophy to our upper grade teachers through the expertise of our literacy team. This year, all grade levels were provided Cluster Coaching opportunities to participate in this rich and meaningful PD that furthers the specific needs of each teacher. In addition, this primary teachers have the opportunity to observe instruction in our 2nd grade Lab Site.

Instructional staff, including administrators and instructional assistants, will be supported by the following on-site professional development:

  • Teachers in grades K-5 participate in coaching of best practices to further their skills in providing a balanced and high quality literacy program to students.
  •  Instructional Coach provides weekly facilitator training using Facilitator training procedures such as Adaptive Schools and Groups that Work.
  •  Instructional staff have the opportunities to participate in FCPS staff development, such as Academy courses, after-school specials sponsored by the central office teams, countywide PD days built into the school calendar. This year, teachers joined various learning cohorts to deeper their understanding in various instructional strategies.
  • Job Embedded--videos of reading and math instruction analyzed by grade level teams during CLTs, coaches’ sharing effective strategies and working with teams to create strong lessons and assessments, and analyzing their data to further their instructional plans.
  • Teachers in grades K-5 will continue to participate in peer support and peer observations and experience Cluster Coaching in the area of literacy and math instruction
  •  Literacy and Math coaching will be a venue to help teachers become more proficient in teaching language arts and mathematics, particularly in guided reading,
  • guided writing, and guided mathematics groups.
  •  FCPS Science specialist providing training for upper grade teachers
  • Staff members participate in choice workshops developed and presented by coaches and teacher leaders on our staff development/teacher workdays throughout the school year.
  • The school collaborates with central office staff to recruit high quality staff to Glen Forest who can fully meet our students' needs. Through participation at job fairs, collaboration with college personnel, and a variety of incentives, recruitment specialists in the FCPS HR department, and Glen Forest school administrators who attend job fairs and college recruitment, continue to build a highly qualified core of teachers for all division schools.

When interviewing for new instructional staff, administrators and staff members on the panel highlight the successes and innovations of Glen Forest in meeting the needs of students and families. Finalist candidates are invited to observe instruction and team collaboration for the target grade level, when available. They are also given the opportunity to ask questions of current team members regarding opportunities for working together as part of the Glen Forest family. Additionally, the staff created a brochure and table mat that highlights our beliefs, values, actions and what makes Glen Forest a great place to work. These materials are given to all applicants.

Our three preschool, eight Kindergarten, and nine first grade classrooms provide important, large scale, opportunities for young children to learn and use their knowledge of literacy and math concepts. The following are ways in which efforts are made to provide seamless transitions from Early Childhood programs into the K-5 program:

FECEP and Special Education preschool students will visit kindergarten classrooms and other areas of the school periodically and at the end of the year specifically. They are included in our specials schedule to provide opportunities to experience Art, Music, PE, and Library before they enter kindergarten.

FECEP teachers will complete a transition form that explains the strengths and areas of growth for the students.

Preschool students who are in special education classes in an FCPS school are observed by a Glen Forest special education teacher prior to the transition IEP being written for kindergarten. This is an important aspect of the transition process and as such, a Glen Forest administrator and special education teachers attend the midyear meeting to discuss transitioning students face to face with their preschool special education teachers.

Kindergarten Orientation--An opportunity for parents of rising kindergarteners to visit Glen Forest and meet the kindergarten teachers, the administrators, counselors and other staff. Parents receive information about important skills students need to have to be ready for kindergarten, as well as a quick introduction to academic areas of focus in kindergarten.

Parents of rising kindergarten students also attend a workshop presented by our literacy and math coaches on ways parents can prepare their child for kindergarten in early June.

Targeted kindergarten students receive additional small group support from a trained Early Intervention Reading Initiative Teacher or their classroom teacher. Teachers are beginning this early intervention as soon as they are done with their preliminary assessment.

The Bridge to Kindergarten summer program provided the opportunity for rising kindergarten students who had no preschool experience to attend school for three weeks, participate in assessments, and be exposed to the rules and routines of a kindergarten classroom.

The Preschool teachers are active participants in the school-wide professional development workshops provided to staff. This enables them to be aware of what their students will experience as they enter the K-5 instructional environment.

Parents and preschool students are invited to all GFES family events; such as, Partners-in-Print, Family Math Night, family field trips, International Night, etc.

Methods to evaluate effectiveness: Student office referral data will be closely monitored throughout the school year. A school team will analyze the data for trends at the end of the year, identifying what further professional learning and supports might be needed. Kindergarten entry data will be reviewed to help identify success of school readiness initiatives.